These Women Are About To Tell You Some Things That Are Absolutely None Of Your Business

POSTED August 24, 2013 @ 09:25 WITH 263,717 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: falulatonks (SOURCE: kissing-whiskey)

On Periods: Let’s put this shit to bed right now: Women don’t lose their minds when they have period-related irritability. It doesn’t lower their ability to reason; it lowers their patience and, hence, tolerance for bullshit. If an issue comes up a lot during “that time of the month,” that doesn’t mean she only cares about it once a month; it means she’s bothered by it all the time and lacks the capacity, once a month, to shove it down and bury it beneath six gulps of willful silence.

hijabican:

Meet the Auburn Tigers, Australia’s first all Muslim Woman Football Team! Read their story on hijabican

POSTED April 14, 2013 @ 19:52 WITH 7,562 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: monkeyknifefight (SOURCE: hijabican)

KANDAHAR, AFGHANISTAN - APRIL 2007: Policewomen from a special unit lead by Officer Malalai Kakar in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Officer Malalai Kakar, 41, and a mother of six children, set up a policewomen’s department in Kandahar, the home of the Taliban in southern Afghanistan. She started out working alone, using her burka to pass unrecognized. Now they are 18 policewomen patrolling in this dangerous city, fighting crime and helping other women. Malalai Kakar was later murdered by insurgents in September 2008 because of her role.

KANDAHAR, AFGHANISTAN - APRIL 2007: Policewomen from a special unit lead by Officer Malalai Kakar in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Officer Malalai Kakar, 41, and a mother of six children, set up a policewomen’s department in Kandahar, the home of the Taliban in southern Afghanistan. She started out working alone, using her burka to pass unrecognized. Now they are 18 policewomen patrolling in this dangerous city, fighting crime and helping other women. Malalai Kakar was later murdered by insurgents in September 2008 because of her role.

POSTED March 26, 2013 @ 16:20 WITH 846 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: falulatonks

In short, to anyone with dating experience, “nice guy” sounds like “essentially lackluster, if largely unobjectionable male person.” And this is what you’re presenting as your best trait. This is what you aspire to. Now, I hear some of you complaining “women always say they want a nice guy.” I know lots of women — I’m even related to a few — and I can’t say I’ve ever heard any of them say that. I can’t prove it, but this sounds like one of those things stand-up comedians say about women and everyone else just repeats. I’ve also never known a woman who cries when she breaks a nail — although I’ve known a few who swear like a 15-year-old sailor in jail — and I’ve never had a woman ask me if her outfit made her look fat unless she actually wanted and subsequently appreciated my opinion. So either I’ve stumbled upon a secret trove of women who aren’t passive-aggressive sob machines, or you need to stop mistaking Dane Cook routines for peer-reviewed sociological studies. At any rate, if a woman does say “I just wish I could find a nice guy,” I would suggest this is the equivalent of “I’m so hungry I could eat a horse.” Which is to say, she’s not hoping you’ll say, “You’re in luck, I have a dead horse in my backyard!” The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis states that the way you use language shapes your perception of the world. (This should not be confused with the Sapir-Worf hypothesis, which states that the Romulans are lying and we should raise shields.) So maybe you’d become a better person if you started by not using such a flaccid, pallid term to refer to yourself. Here’s my suggestion: Instead of trying to be a nice guy, aspire to be a good man. You might be surprised at the results.

POSTED February 24, 2013 @ 15:52 WITH 30,794 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: belinsky (SOURCE: Wired)

You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting “Vanity,” thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for you own pleasure.

POSTED February 22, 2013 @ 01:01 WITH 112,927 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: falulatonks (SOURCE: homeless-dad)
mjolkk:

Drug Rape Prevention: DrinkSavvy Color Changing Drinkware
The problem is that date rape drugs are odorless, colorless, and tasteless once they’re in your drink.  We all know not to leave our drinks unattended, but the reality is it’s impossible to keep an eye on your drink all night.  So what’s the solution?  With the help of Dr. John MacDonald, a professor of chemistry at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and with the help of Contract Researching Organizations, DrinkSavvy is developing material that will immediately change color to warn you if a drug is slipped into your drink.

Great!  But it doesn’t stop there.  Together, DrinkSavvy will have the funding necessary to fully develop the material and drinkware directly from this material, such as, Plastic Straws and Stirrers, Plastic Party Cups, and Glassware.        
That means discrete, 100% effortless, and continuous drink monitoring throughout the night, because the same drinkware that you are drinking with…is also the color changing material that makes invisible drugs visible.
While DrinkSavvy’s initial goal is to perfect our design to make our products available online and free to select rape crisis centers, DrinkSavvy’s ultimate goal is to use the success of this campaign to convince bars, clubs, and colleges to make DrinkSavvy the new safety standard and eventually make drug-facilitated sexual assault a crime of the past.  So please, back DrinkSavvy to be a part of something that will change the world for the better.  Back DrinkSavvy to be a part of something that has never been done before, and back DrinkSavvy to prevent someone you care about from possibly being the victim of drug-facilitated sexual assault. Thank you all so much in advance, and remember, when you’re out drinking, drink smart, drink safe, DrinkSavvy.
CONTRIBUTE NOW!

mjolkk:

Drug Rape Prevention: DrinkSavvy Color Changing Drinkware

The problem is that date rape drugs are odorless, colorless, and tasteless once they’re in your drink.  We all know not to leave our drinks unattended, but the reality is it’s impossible to keep an eye on your drink all night.  So what’s the solution?  With the help of Dr. John MacDonald, a professor of chemistry at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and with the help of Contract Researching Organizations, DrinkSavvy is developing material that will immediately change color to warn you if a drug is slipped into your drink.

image

Great!  But it doesn’t stop there.  Together, DrinkSavvy will have the funding necessary to fully develop the material and drinkware directly from this material, such as, Plastic Straws and Stirrers, Plastic Party Cups, and Glassware.        

That means discrete, 100% effortless, and continuous drink monitoring throughout the night, because the same drinkware that you are drinking with…is also the color changing material that makes invisible drugs visible.

While DrinkSavvy’s initial goal is to perfect our design to make our products available online and free to select rape crisis centers, DrinkSavvy’s ultimate goal is to use the success of this campaign to convince bars, clubs, and colleges to make DrinkSavvy the new safety standard and eventually make drug-facilitated sexual assault a crime of the past.  So please, back DrinkSavvy to be a part of something that will change the world for the better.  Back DrinkSavvy to be a part of something that has never been done before, and back DrinkSavvy to prevent someone you care about from possibly being the victim of drug-facilitated sexual assault. Thank you all so much in advance, and remember, when you’re out drinking, drink smart, drink safe, DrinkSavvy.

CONTRIBUTE NOW!

There’s a poisonous double standard in our society which says that it’s reverse-sexist and wrong for women to feel threatened by creepy-awkward male behaviour because our fear implies that we hold the negative, stereotypical view that All Men Are Predators, but that if we’re raped or sexually assaulted by any man with whom we’ve had prior social interaction – and particularly if he’s expressed some sexual or romantic interest in us during that time – it’s reasonable for observers to ask what precautions we took to prevent the assault from happening, or to suggest that we maybe led the guy on by not stating our feelings plainly. The result is a situation where women are punished if we reject, avoid or identify creepy men, and then told it’s our fault if we’re assaulted by someone we plainly ought to have rejected, avoided, identified.

We don’t lift weights in order to look hot, especially for the likes of men like that. What makes them think that we even WANT them to find us attractive? If you do, thanks very much, we’re flattered. But if you don’t, why do you really need to voice this opinion in the first place, and what makes you think we actually give a toss that you, personally, do not find us attractive? What do you want us to do? Shall we stop weightlifting, amend our diet in order to completely get rid of our ‘manly’ muscles, and become housewives in the sheer hope that one day you will look more favourably upon us and we might actually have a shot with you?! Cause you are clearly the kindest, most attractive type of man to grace the earth with your presence.

 - Zoe Smith, 18 year old weightlifter currently representing Great Britain at the Olympics, responding to tweets labelling her muscles “unattractive” and “unfeminine”. (via rawwomen)
POSTED July 30, 2012 @ 18:01 WITH 14,656 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: heathicorn (SOURCE: rawwomen)

thalamtnafsee:

I think this deserves a standing ovation in front of the mainstream feminists who have constantly dehumanized and demeaned our existence as Muslim women by suggesting that we’re oppressed people. This deserves a standing ovation in front of the hundreds of men who have claimed that the religion of Islam does not tolerate liberated and free women (which is, of course, contrary to the teachings of Muhammad). This deserves recognition; Muslim women are participating in wrestling, swimming, shooting, and other physically demanding sports while wearing the physical hijab.

All of you are my role models; go kick me some misogynistic ass ladies!

POSTED July 30, 2012 @ 02:15 WITH 10,436 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: gadsfasdfgasdf (SOURCE: thalamtnafsee)

Women invented all the core technologies that made civilization possible. This isn’t some feminist myth; it’s what modern anthropologists believe. Women are thought to have invented pottery, basketmaking, weaving, textiles, horticulture, and agriculture. That’s right: without women’s inventions, we wouldn’t be able to carry things or store things or tie things up or go fishing or hunt with nets or haft a blade or wear clothes or grow our food or live in permanent settlements. Suck on that.

Women have continued to be involved in the creation and advancement of civilization throughout history, whether you know it or not. Pick anything—a technology, a science, an art form, a school of thought—and start digging into the background. You’ll find women there, I guarantee, making critical contributions and often inventing the damn shit in the first place.

Women have made those contributions in spite of astonishing hurdles. Hurdles like not being allowed to go to school. Hurdles like not being allowed to work in an office with men, or join a professional society, or walk on the street, or own property. Example: look up Lise Meitner some time. When she was born in 1878 it was illegal in Austria for girls to attend school past the age of 13. Once the laws finally eased up and she could go to university, she wasn’t allowed to study with the men. Then she got a research post but wasn’t allowed to use the lab on account of girl cooties. Her whole life was like this, but she still managed to discover nuclear fucking fission. Then the Nobel committee gave the prize to her junior male colleague and ignored her existence completely.

Men in all patriarchal civilizations, including ours, have worked to downplay or deny women’s creative contributions. That’s because patriarchy is founded on the belief that women are breeding stock and men are the only people who can think. The easiest way for men to erase women’s contributions is to simply ignore that they happened. Because when you ignore something, it gets forgotten. People in the next generation don’t hear about it, and so they grow up thinking that no women have ever done anything. And then when women in their generation do stuff, they think “it’s a fluke, never happened before in the history of the world, ignore it.” And so they ignore it, and it gets forgotten. And on and on and on. The New York Times article is a perfect illustration of this principle in action.

Finally, and this is important: even those women who weren’t inventors and intellectuals, even those women who really did spend all their lives doing stereotypical “women’s work”—they also built this world. The mundane labor of life is what makes everything else possible. Before you can have scientists and engineers and artists, you have to have a whole bunch of people (and it’s usually women) to hold down the basics: to grow and harvest and cook the food, to provide clothes and shelter, to fetch the firewood and the water, to nurture and nurse, to tend and teach. Every single scrap of civilized inventing and dreaming and thinking rides on top of that foundation. Never forget that.

 -

from a post by Reclusive Leftist on women’s erasure in history. 

her comments relate specifically to an article by the NYT thanking “the men” who invented modern technology, but pick absolutely any academic field of study, and women’s contributions are minimized, if not outright ignored.

literature has been a huge part of my life for a long time, and i grew up reading the classics—which, of course, are typically books written by white men, depicting their experiences. i was taught that the first “modern novel” was Don Quixote, written in the early 1600s by a guy (Cervantes). i don’t think i know of a word to accurately describe my mixture of outrage, shock, and pride, when i discovered later that actually, the first modern novel was written 600 years earlier—by a woman! (it’s The Tale of Genji, written by a Japanese lady-in-waiting who was known as Murasaki Shikibu.)

this might not seem important, but if you’re a woman you know just how vital this knowledge is. even now, when women are being told that we can do anything we set our minds to, the historical, literary, and scientific figures we learn about are all men. it’s a much more insidious way to discourage women from aiming high—because what’s the point in putting in so much hard work if it’s not even going to be remembered after you’re dead?

(via sendforbromina)

chihuahuawho:

History in the making; Saudi women walking proudly among the Olympic athletes for the first time ever

chihuahuawho:

History in the making; Saudi women walking proudly among the Olympic athletes for the first time ever

POSTED July 28, 2012 @ 04:32 WITH 68,889 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: falulatonks (SOURCE: chihuahuawho)
”To me, what hurts me, is the fact that you are told all the times: “we are equal” like “I don’t know what is your deal” like “what is your fucking issue with this or with that?” but then you realize: no, actually we are not! You are getting paid more than I. You get to have more options in terms of what you want to watch for entertainment. When you go to the movies you have 90 movies. 90 different stories that you can watch through your eyes, through the eyes of a male. And one complain that I might make - one observation - that’s actually very very truth about the fact that there isn’t enough things for us, for women out there it’s like ”shut up!” Why aren’t you happy? Why can’t you just be like every girl? Just… why do you always have to try to be the man? It’s not even about trying to be the man, it’s about trying to feel significant, trying to feel equal, trying to believe that my purpose in life was more than just be half of something else and deliver the packages, the kids to this individual so that they can glorify themselves. By the time of my 30’s and I fall in love and I have a career, I’m gonna be making less than a man, I’m gonna lose my name to a man. […] And by the time that they come back they are unattractive! (x)
POSTED July 08, 2012 @ 07:54 WITH 7,530 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: falulatonks (SOURCE: closetalkers)

“Willow Smith, you’re 11 years old. Nobody needs advice about ‘being themselves’ from you. Call us back when you get your period” was tweeted and retweeted hundreds of times last night and Monday morning.
Considering what black children learn about blackness, subtly and openly, in the media and in American culture, don’t we want them to have the strength and resilience to say, “I am not your stereotype, but I am me”? Don’t we want them to feel comfortable in their skin? Don’t we want black children to be as free as other children? Don’t we want to inoculate little girls against the onslaught of shitty messages about black femaleness?Perhaps we don’t.
I can’t help but set reaction to Willow Smith next to the plethora of young male performers who brag about swag and girls and money without raising so much as an eyebrow. But a little black girl sings “your validation is not that important to me,” and all hell breaks loose.
Much reaction to Willow Smith also confirms the way women are expected to perform femininity. One person live tweeting the BET Awards offered that Willow Smith was “turning into a little lesbian,” and that wasn’t the only message speculating on the 11-year-old’s sexuality or questioning her gender. Another tweeter snarked that rapper Tyga and Willow are one in the same.
There would be nothing wrong If Willow were to identify as a lesbian or a boy, but what narrow parameters are we placing on girls and women if simply wearing our hair short, sporting a button down over skinny jeans, and daring to mount a skateboard dictates all anyone needs to know about who we are and who we love?
What’s the problem? If I had a little girl, I would be excited as all get out if she were like Willow Smith. I wish I had been more like Willow at 11. (But then, I don’t have multimillionaire parents, which makes some difference, yes?) We lament the presence of strong role models for our children. They could certainly do a lot worse than idolizing a seemingly smart, engaging, self-assured, quirky black girl. That so many of us don’t recognize that says a lot about our society — none of it good. | The Willow Text: What the Reaction to Willow Smith Says About Us (x)

“Willow Smith, you’re 11 years old. Nobody needs advice about ‘being themselves’ from you. Call us back when you get your period” was tweeted and retweeted hundreds of times last night and Monday morning.

Considering what black children learn about blackness, subtly and openly, in the media and in American culture, don’t we want them to have the strength and resilience to say, “I am not your stereotype, but I am me”? Don’t we want them to feel comfortable in their skin? Don’t we want black children to be as free as other children? Don’t we want to inoculate little girls against the onslaught of shitty messages about black femaleness?Perhaps we don’t.

I can’t help but set reaction to Willow Smith next to the plethora of young male performers who brag about swag and girls and money without raising so much as an eyebrow. But a little black girl sings “your validation is not that important to me,” and all hell breaks loose.

Much reaction to Willow Smith also confirms the way women are expected to perform femininity. One person live tweeting the BET Awards offered that Willow Smith was “turning into a little lesbian,” and that wasn’t the only message speculating on the 11-year-old’s sexuality or questioning her gender. Another tweeter snarked that rapper Tyga and Willow are one in the same.

There would be nothing wrong If Willow were to identify as a lesbian or a boy, but what narrow parameters are we placing on girls and women if simply wearing our hair short, sporting a button down over skinny jeans, and daring to mount a skateboard dictates all anyone needs to know about who we are and who we love?

What’s the problem? If I had a little girl, I would be excited as all get out if she were like Willow Smith. I wish I had been more like Willow at 11. (But then, I don’t have multimillionaire parents, which makes some difference, yes?) We lament the presence of strong role models for our children. They could certainly do a lot worse than idolizing a seemingly smart, engaging, self-assured, quirky black girl. That so many of us don’t recognize that says a lot about our society — none of it good. | The Willow Text: What the Reaction to Willow Smith Says About Us (x)

I can say whatever I want. I can look however I want. But we are definitely put in boxes, I mean like, annoyingly so. […] Especially compared to guys, I know for a fact, because I’ve known so many actors, personally, and also I’m interested in it so I pay attention. Guys have more room for personality, you’re allowed to be yourself, you’re allowed to be different and people don’t really comment on it. But as a girl, the room is, you have much, much less room to be yourself. It’s just weird. Everybody has to be the same.

 - Kristen Stewart’s response when asked about being a woman in 2010 and female empowerment (via tomsturridges)
POSTED June 28, 2012 @ 17:32 WITH 1,074 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: falulatonks (SOURCE: youtube.com)